AHHA Education

Problem

The beginnings of AHHA Education can be traced back to Cambodia in 1997. At this time the national school drop-out rate was 73%, one of the highest in the world and a detrimental lasting legacy of the Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s, when educated people were systematically hunted down and killed. This meant that even after the fall of the regime in 1979, there were very few properly educated individuals left in Cambodia to pass on their knowledge to the next generation.

In addition, Cambodia faces many educational problems that can be found in other developing nations such as limited access to schools, poor facilities and teaching, limited funds, gender inequality and other prejudices, to name but a few. These issues are especially prevalent within less developed rural areas, and much the same can be said of Laos, Timor Leste, India and Thailand where AHHA also operates.

Whilst the situation continues to gradually improve in South East Asia, there are still a great many barriers to overcome.

 

Cambodia:

  • Youth (15-24) literacy rate:
    • Male = 88.4%
    • Female = 85.9%
  • Pre-primary school enrolment ratio:
    • Male = 13%
    • Female = 13.6%
  • Primary school attendance ratio:
    • Male = 85.2%
    • Female = 83.4%
  • Primary school completion ratio:
    • According to admin data = 61.3%
    • According to survey data = 92.2%
  • Secondary school attendance ratio
    • Male = 45.9%
    • Female = 44.7%

Timor Leste:

  • Youth (15-24) literacy rate:
    • Male = 80.5%
    • Female = 78.6%
  • Pre-primary school enrolment ratio:
    • Male = Unavailable
    • Female = Unavailable
  • Primary school attendance ratio:
    • Male = 71.2%
    • Female = 73%
  • Primary school completion ratio:
    • According to admin data = 83.6%
    • According to survey data = 90.5%
  • Secondary school attendance ratio
    • Male = 43.1%
    • Female = 47.6%

Laos:

  • Youth (15-24) literacy rate:
    • Male = 89.2%
    • Female = 78.7%
  • Pre-primary school enrolment ratio:
    • Male = 22.9%
    • Female = 24.3%
  • Primary school attendance ratio:
    • Male = 85.2%
    • Female = 84.7%
  • Primary school completion ratio:
    • According to admin data = 68%
    • According to survey data = 94.9% 
  • Secondary school attendance ratio
    • Male = 44.7%
    • Female = 44.6%

India:

  • Youth (15-24) literacy rate:
    • Male = 88.4%
    • Female = 74.4%
  • Pre-primary school enrolment ratio:
    • Male = 53.8%
    • Female = 55.9%
  • Primary school attendance ratio:
    • Male = 85.2%
    • Female = 81.4%
  • Primary school completion ratio:
    • According to admin data = Unavailable
    • According to survey data = 94.6%
  • Secondary school attendance ratio
    • Male = 58.5%
    • Female = 48.7%

Thailand:

  • Youth (15-24) literacy rate:
    • Male = 98.2%
    • Female = 97.9%
  • Pre-primary school enrolment ratio:
    • Male = 100.6%
    • Female = 100%
  • Primary school attendance ratio:
    • Male = 97.9%
    • Female = 97.9%
  • Primary school completion ratio:
    • According to admin data = Unavailable
    • According to survey data = 98.9%
  • Secondary school attendance ratio
    • Male = 76.6%
    • Female = 83.1%

As we can see from the above statistics, the attendance ratios for secondary school are considerably lower than those for primary school. As such, the data suggests that a great number of students fail to progress to obtain anything further than the most basic level of education in many South East Asian nations.

(All statistics obtained from Unicef)

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